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Framingham State College 



Framingham MA, 01701 



DIAL 1988 



Vol 70 



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096 




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Table of Contents 

Student Life 18 



Clubs & Organizations 



Sports 



Faculty & Administration 



Seniors 



68 



92 





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Campus Sites 



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In the library, silence is defined quite loosely. 





Popular fashions catch on quickly. 





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Desk workers are ware- 
houses of information. 









Dial 88 






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"Is that dishwashing liquid you're soaking 
your hands in, Michael?" 



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Campus Sites 




Pouring oven great literature aids in quenching the desire for 
knowledge. 





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Dial 88 





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Smiling appears to be a contagious condition. 














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Campus Sites 




In reference to cultural events, concents have big turnouts. 



It's best to size up the situation 
before taking a stand. 




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Friends are close at all times. 




Dial 88 



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Getting carried away is pant of helping out. 



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Campus Sites 





A Whittemore workaholic. 




The term paper terror. 





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11 




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Campus Sites 




Relaxation time helps ease stressful, hectic schedules. 




Various, talented artists are frequently 
brought in to provide entertainment. 







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Long time College Center co-workers 
break long enough to pose. 




Friendly and helpful staff are at the heart of the system. 




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13 




Thoughts of the future invade 
the minds of the graduates. 



Innovative marketing devices and smooth sales 
pitches are vital to successful fund-raising. 




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14 



Campus Sites 




On rare occasions, social gatherings create new dimensions where the freedom for true 
expression exists. 





Mary B. , #3, that's me. 



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15 






Utter frustration peaks. 




Class notes comprise the bulk of study materials. 




Who will pick up the tab is a controversial 
pub topic. 



16 



Campus Sites 




Working in teams is the key 




Time management is an im- 
portant issue. 




Some friends like having their pictures taken together, 
and some don't. 





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Video games serve as great wrist builders in 
preparation for long hours of writing. 















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With poise, clothing is used to 
project school spirit. 




Taking notice that there's always room for one more, passensby 
are beckoned to join in the evening's activities. 




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20 



Student Life 



Homecoming Weekend 




Excitement was in the air over the annual activities that ac- 
companied the Homecoming football game. Although the State foot- 
ball team lost, the cheerleaders kept the fans' spirits soaring. During 
half-time Christopher Darcy and Cara Swan were voted Homecoming 
Ambassadors. On the Friday evening of Homecoming weekend, 
many attended the dateless semi-formal at the Indian Meadows 
Country Club. The students danced the night away to the music of the 
Marsells. After the game, the Del Fuegos helped bring the weekend to 
an end. 



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21 




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22 



Student Life 




"We're number one! " The SGA team came in first place in the afternoon session 
of the Ram Olympics activities. 











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Ram 
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24 



Student Life 



\Sandbox XXIV 





These two reverted to bright, cheery faces in an 
attempt to drum up business. 





Gazing intensely as a new band appeared, specta- 
tors braved the weather as the night went on. 




One of many manned tables vended its goods 
in an effort to raise funds. 



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25 




Those who attended the events participated in, 
as well as observed, the various acts. 





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With the end of October came Sandbox XXIV, bring- 
ing along the sights and sounds of an outdoor car- 
nival. State Street was blocked off and lined with an 
array of student peddlers as the performances got un- 
derway. Comics, musicians and artists alike displayed 
their antics amidst the roving onlookers. Overall, 
Sandbox XXIV created an atmosphere of creativity and 
enjoyment. 



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26 



Campus Sites 



Monrter Mask Weekend 





Father Ed Salerno convents yet another heathen 
to Roman Catholicism. 



Halloween is always a time for great fun, and the Monster Mash Weekend certainly 
fit the bill. The always popular Rocky Horror started the weekend off and a jam 
packed Stompers concert brought the festivities to an exciting conclusion. 



Dial 88 



27 





Stampers guitarist, Al Baglio entertains everyone while, at the 
same time proving, that you can be famous and only know two 
chords. 





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Costume winners CL-RD 3rd place tie between Hugh Dykens [Fig Newton) and Kathleen 
Mulligan CHershey Kiss], 2nd Place. Adeana Tanko CTeabagD, and 1 st place Lara Flynn and 
boyfriend CQ-tipsD. 





Student Life 




Feijfers People 



Hilltop's performances this year showed the less se- 
rious side of life. "Feiffer's People," the fall show, ex- 
amined the absurdities of life in a series of comic yet re- 
vealing skits. The spring show, Little Shop of Horrors, 
featured the adventures of a plant with a taste for blood. It 
was definitely one of F.S.C.'s more interesting produc- 
tions. 



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29 



Little Shop of Horrors 




The cause of it all, the blood hungry plant, Audrey II. 






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30 



Student Life 



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Oxford Debate '88 






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31 




The Oxford Debate which relies 
on audience participation and 
most interesting debate tech- 
niques for its more amusing and 
memorable moments was no dif- 
ferent in this year's debate. 

The topic of this year's debate, 



"People are unfit to choose their 
own leaders" featured members 
from both schools on either team. 
Arguments centered on the im- 
portance of media exposure 
versus the freedom of choice. 
The delivery of a pizza during 



the debate served as a pivotal de- 
fense for the freedom of choice. 
The supporters equated the 
choice of a leader to the choice of 
toppings on a pizza. Anchovies 
anyone? 



32 



Student Life 



Humanities Players 




Humanities Players, a small but dedicated 
group of thespians who enjoy exploring the world 
of literary artists such as Wordsworth or perform- 
ing plays for the college community have devel- 
oped a loyal following that appreciate the forward 
progress of the arts. 




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33 



Arts O- Humanities Programs 




Tom Cottle lectures on "Tomorrow's Family. 




Author David McCord signs his book "One Day at A 
Time." 




Ralph Nadar lectures on "The Mence of 
Atomic Energy. " 



The Arts and Humanities Programs of 
this year have resulted in inviting many 
distinguished people to address the college 
community. Some of this semesters guests 
included Ralph Nadar, Dr. Tom Cottle, 
Jane Brody, Authors Toni Morrisson, 
David McCord and RoseEllen Brown. 
Future Arts and Humanities Programs will 
provide campus with many other intelli- 
gent and interesting points of view. 



34 



Student Life 




Lieutenant Governor Evelyn Murphy speaks on "Women in 
Politics. " 



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36 



Student Life 



Ram Aid 111 



Ram Aid III, sponsored by the Class of 88, is one of the 
college's more popular events. It gives the students a 
chance to act as their favorite performers. A chance to let 
loose, have a lot of fun, and maybe even get prize money 
for it. This year's winner gave us his impression of 
Whitney Houston. Ram Aid lets us take a tongue-in- 
cheek look at pop culture. It always provides for a lot of 
laughs. You never know what you are going to see. It is 
certainly one of the more interesting outlets for creative 
expression at F.S.C. 











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38 



Student Life 



\S and box XXV 



Fun was had by all at the silver an- 
niversary spring Sandbox XXV 
which featured many new attrac- 
tions. Among the more popular 
were the "Create your own News- 
paper Headlines" and a special re- 
cording booth where students could 
make a tape of themselves singing 
their favorite song. 

Other booths included balloon 
animals, photo-buttons and a cari- 
caturist. There were plenty of co- 
medians amusing the crowd while 
executing sleight of hand. 

The crowd braved a chilly wind 
outside while enjoying the talent of 
Kevin Spencer magician, campus 
bands and free Smartfood popcorn. 




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39 




40 



Student Life 





The bands at Sandbox XXV offered a sampling of the 
musical talent on campus. Many styles of music were 
showcased from rock and roll to rap. Also included was the 
final Sandbox performance of local band, Nitrous, led by 
Jeff Chaulk. Nitrous has provided the closing band per- 
formance for several past Sandbox weekends. Once again 
the Sandbox celebration gave the students plenty to party 
with until it came time to be students once again. 






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42 



Student Life 




Heard it through the — says Karen as she picks up the back of the 
line. 




The men enjoy a cold been while listening to the concert from the pub. 



The Boyz performed at the Sandbox XXV 
concert/dance. The dance brought 
Sandbox XXV to a good close. The crowd 
had a chance to dance the night away 
thanks to the great music. 






























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43 





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The ladies enjoy a pitcher of been too. 





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A birds-eye view of the fun the crowd is ex- 
periencing at the dance. 



44 



Student Life 



Lamed Hall 




Behold, our fearless leader, Elis- 
abeth Hogan. 



Larned Hall houses ap- 
proximately 400 co-ed stu- 
dents. These students are in top 
physical condition from brav- 
ing that never ending hill that 
they live upon. Also, being the 
dorm closest to the library, 
Larned's students are an ex- 
ample of upmost intelligence. 
Hall Government provided 
students with monthly news- 
letters and other activities to en- 
tertain themselves. 






It's time for end of semester cleaning again. 



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Student Life 




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47 







Towers Hall, the largest co-ed resi- 
dence hall on campus houses between 
450 and 500 students. Being one of the 
more popular dorms on campus, Towers 
has a reputation of being one of the 
better dorms to live in. Due to the size, it 
allows for many different types of people 
to be put together. This, of course, pro- 
vides large groups a chance to get 
together and study. When all the work is 
done they can have fun too. It is. always 
important to have correct priorities. 



48 



Student Life 




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Linsley Hall 





Please deposit 1 O& for an additional three minutes. 



Linsley Hall is the third co-ed 
dorm at F.S.C. The three floor 
building houses approximately 
thirty five males and (lucky for 
them) two hundred and sev- 
enty females. Linsley, not 
being located in the center of 
campus is not often a first 
choice for incoming students. 
The students residing there, 
however have had pleasant ex- 
periences. Linsley has been de- 
scribed by its students as a 
"close-knit" residential com- 
munity. 





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50 



Student Life 



Horace Mann Halt 
Peirce Hall 





And these are the days of our dorms. 



Often referred to as sister 
dorms, Horace Mann and 
Peirce Halls continue with 
tradition in providing single 
rooms to over two hundred 
female students. The buildings 
themselves undertook ren- 
ovations over this past year, 
with Peirce Hall gaining an 
annex and Horace Mann Hall 
being re-faced. The jovial 
atmosphere within the struc- 
tures remained, however, as re- 
sidents strove to make adap- 
tations in crowd living. Overall, 
the laid back atmosphere and 
degree of privacy the two offer 
continue to draw many people 
to its quarters. 





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Dial 88 



51 





Despite the academic responsibilities college brings, socializing, too, plays an im- 
portant role in students' every-day lives. For residents living in Horace Mann and 
Peirce Halls, the lobbies are frequently used to catch each other up on campus 
news while the hall phones provide a link to the outside world. 




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52 



Student Life 




O'Connor Hall, an all female 
dorm offers students a place 
where they can successfully com- 
bine getting work done and find- 
ing and socializing with a new, in- 
teresting group of people. 
O'Connor sponsors many pro- 
grams geared towards helping 
the student. Such programs have 
included Stress Management and 
Self-defense. The residence hall 
also provides chances for women 
to get together socially for make- 
your-own sundaes or to have a 
hall pizza party. 




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Student Life 



Campus Buildings 




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Crocker Hall 




Dwight Hall 




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56 



Student Life 



Hypnotist 




The Hypnotist caused many interesting reactions to 
hypnotizing an entire group of people. The power of one 
can have over the subconscious mind can lead to inter- 
esting results. 





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57 



Watty Cottins 
Comedian 




Barry Drake 




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Caricaturist Neat Portnoy 








Lynn's expression speaks for itself at 
the caricature artist. 



58 



Student Life 



1 Comedian Jeff Justice L^" fff< * T ^^ 




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60 



Student Life 



Black Awareness Week 




Black Awareness Week offered lectures, dances and 
performances sponsored by the Third World Organiza- 
tion, that brought forward questions concerning where 
minorities stand in today's society. Some of this year's 
events included a gospel choir performance, a dance 
featuring Hawkeye, an acapella singing group called Re- 
gency, and the featured lecturer, reknown author Maya 
Angelou. 



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Author Maya Angelou, one of the most popular lecturers of the week, while 
recounting her past adventures, comments on the place of black Ameri- 
cans in today's society. 





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Student Life 




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Student Life 









13S 8 Spring break 




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Student Life 




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Clubs and Organizations 




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DIAL 88 



71 



Films Committee 





Polly Nynes, Anne Marie Mitchell, Tim Baker, Melanie Clark, Kim 
Check 



Concerts Committee 





Karla overdoes it with the balloons. 



Camille Stellato, Stacy Iwanski, Peter Salenious. 2nd row: Linda 
Bowman, Lisa Rosen, Marsha Phillrick, Cori Spezeski, Stephanie 
Hutnak. 3rd row: Christine Manning and Peter Noonan. 



The Student Union Activities Board is one of the strongest and most 
active organizations on campus. This year's SUAB boasted a member- 
ship of over eighty students the entire school year. SUAB is respon- 
sible for many of the schools successful events such as Sandbox, the 
weekend movie and comedy night at the pub. 

They were also in charge of booking such concerts as Positive, The 
Fools, The Del Fuegos and The Stompers. If there is anything fun on 
campus SUAB is probably behind it somehow! 




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72 



Clubs and Organizations 




Travel and Recreation Committee 




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1 st row: Linda Medugno, Karla Mancini, Victoria Camara, Kathy O'Brien. 2nd row: Cathy Harrington, Chrissy 
Cameron, Elinor Fagnoe, Cyndy Martino, Stephanie Matson. 3rd row: Paul McDonald, Peter Salenius. 



Arts &- Lectures, 
Daytime, Five O- Dime 
Publicity Committees 




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Beth Wheeler, Rachel Sandberg, Shelia Consoli, Carrie 
Bach, Geno Martino, Trisha Whitlock, Anne Whitlock, Dan 
Dowd, Linda Castelon, Rick Eroloni. 










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Executive Board 




1 st row: Tamara Woodward, Treasurer; Chris Darcy, Vice President; Diane Dubious, Secretary; Roland Arcand, 
President; Kim Martino, Vice President of Programming. 2nd row: Karla Mancini, Travel Recreation; Stacy Iwanski, 
Concerts; Carrie Bach, Five and Dime; Ellen Servetnick, Advisor; Tim Baker, Films; Beth Wheeler, Arts & Lectures; 
Shelia Consoli, Publicity; Rachel Sandberg, Daytime. 





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74 



Clubs and Organizations 



Class 
of 

1388 




1 st row: Cars Swan, Ann Marie Collins, Michelle Radie, Paul McDonald, Diane Dbois, 
Chris Darcy. 2nd row: Elinor Fagone, Ellen Servetnick, Rick Buckingham, Anne Whit- 
lock, Rich Porcelli, Tim Baker. 3rd row: Karla Mancini, Greg White, Roland Arcand. 




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75 



Class of 133 / 




Brian Salvagio, Stephanie Matson, Kelly Gillis, Chris MacDonald, Kathy O'Brien, Terry Ander- 
son, Linda Medugno. 



Board of Govenors 




1 st row: Matt Wissel, Elinor Fagnoe, Sean Corey, Ruthann Pearlman, Michael Miller. 2nd row: Rodney 
Green, Larry Mosher, Chris Darcy, Roland Arcand, Beth Corbin, Bev Weiss, Becky Taylor. 



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Clubs and Organizations 




1 st raw: Jim Berry, Chip Kelly, Al Craven, Pat Hughes, Todd Larsen, Mike Langone, Bill 2nd raw: Michael Keating, Dan 
Lynch, Dave Scheibent, John Hawes, Mike McKenna, Skip Smith, John Hubbard. 3rd row: Bill Forsyth, Dave Buckley, 
Dan O'Shea, Ed Salerno, Mike Moro, Kevin Quinn, Henry Miller. 




Rugby Club's "Rent a Rugger" to benefit the team. 



1 



Players rush to get possession and start the attack 
on the goal. 



The Rugby Club continues to prove its ever-growing popularity as 
sport gains new members and a bigger following with every passing 
season. Known for its roughness, its the perfect sport for those people 
who want to rid themselves of aggression — or involuntarily give 
blood. Whatever your pleasure it is an exciting sport to be part of. Play- 
ing teams from schools such as Havard, BC, BU, and Wentworth, FSC 
was a very eager and determined team. 






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77 




Players begin a play fighting for the ball in a scrum, There is a point to looking this silly. 



78 



Clubs and Organizations 




1 987-88 Senators: 1 st raw: Pauline Ghize, Ray Cornelius, Michelle Radle, Chris Darcy, Suzanne Flyod, Ruthann Pearlman. 2nd row: Mark 
Santamaria. Matt Wissell, Hiedi Gustafson, Kim Gleason, Scott Cashman, Marianne O'Brien. 3rd row: Dan Lynch, Kristin Doherty, Cindy 
O'Donnell, Stephanie Matson, Kathy O'Brien, Pauline Wallace, Peggy Yeomans, Brian Ahern, Lynn Valcourt, Kristien Savery, Cara Swan, 
Kristin Allen, Mary McLaughlin. -4th row: John Baron, Bob Gardiner, Leo Mastrototoro, Roland Arcand, Scott Sambuchi. Rick Porcelli, 
Rodney Green, Jeff Bulman, Ellen Servetnick. 



Student Government Association 



SGA is the student representative body for the political 
and social happenings around campus. SGA is responsible 
for protecting students' rights and allotting funds to the 
clubs and organizations on campus. SGA is concerned 
with both the college and outside communities. Some of 
the events sponsored this year included blood drives, co- 
sponsoring Midnight Madness, and S.O.U.T.H. (Students 
Opposed to Unfair Tuition Hikes) which was instrumental 
in a protest against the Spring tuition hikes. Whatever the 
subject, SGA works to benefit the student population. 
They work to keep students informed of what is happening 
inside and outside of school. 




Rick, is that call business or personal? 



DIAL 88 



79 




The result of Hiedi's hours of dedication. 




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Even Senators have fun! The winners of Ram Olympics show off. 



Matt makes himself 
comfortable. 






80 



Clubs and Organizations 




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81 




Hi [[{op Players 




Question of the day: What did Rik do now? 




82 



Clubs and Organizations 



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1 st row: Kariann Vakskjold [Norway], Cecihe Leung [Macao), Nuna M. Ahmed CSomaha), Shing-Jen 
Yang [Taiwan). 2nd row: Sourin Etyemezian [Jordan), Janz Lee [Hong Kong), Sharon Lane [USA), 
Monika Walker [England), Alexander Haile [Ethiopia). 3rd row: Yin-Sham [Hong Kong), Sui-Ling Kan 
[Hong Kong), Karine Fong [Hong Kong), Gina Arakil [Syria), Racheal Valcin [Haiti). 




The International Club submitted several arti- 
cles to the Gatepost concerning international 
issues. Club members organizes an international 
day for the Campus on April 21, 1988 containing a 
Cultural Exhibition representing the distinct 
countries traditional clothing, art work and 
music. The Club also prepared an international 
buffet from their home lands for the Faculty and 
the College Community. 

The 3rd World Organizations was a large par- 
ticipant in the annual Black awareness week ac- 
tivities on campus. 3rd World also sponsored sev- 
eral dances during the academic year featuring 
there own Jomo King, disc jockey. 




Disc Jockey Jomo King. 






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83 




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3rd World 
Organization 




1 st row: Susan Alexis, John Lewis, Lucy Veiga, Saudonya Daniel. 2nd row: Juanita Timpson, 
Christine Allen, Alisa Montero, David Biggs, Karen Groce. 3rd row: Myrna Cassion, Rachelle 
Exume, Dwayne Sparks, Eric Walker, Jomo King, Ray Morgan, Eddie Pean, 
Barbra Holland, Sean Shuemate, David Ware. 



James Whitfield, 



84 



Clubs and Organizations 



Business d>- 
Economics 



The Business and Economics 
Club provides students of the 
Framingham State community to 
discuss current issues of the busi- 
ness and economic world. The 
club provides the students with 
field trips, study groups, and the 
chance for outstanding students 
to be recognized by the National 
Honor Society, Omicron Delta 
Epsilon. 




1 9BB members. 1 st row: Lew Grinnan, Eric Walker, Carolyn Macheod. 2nd 
row: Debra Vanania, Prof. Maureen Dunne, Rick Ciolino. 




1 9E38 Chorale. 1 st row: Lisa Tanger, Sue Cournoyer, Holly Spurr, Kim Gleason, Monika Walker, Jennifer Sanford, 
Carmel Roach. 2nd row: Karen Kerstgens, Karen Foote, Pauline Wallace, Pam Decker, Mary Eddelston, Patricia Pen- 
delton, Karen Burke, Dr. Savas, Paul Feldman, Tim loannides. 



Music 



The Music Club of F.S.C. allows 
students a showcase for their musical 
talents. The Chorus and Chorale pre- 
sent both a Christmas and a Spring 
Concert. Students who play instru- 
ments are invited to join the Mixed En- 
semble. 




At the annual spring semester Chorale Concert. 



DIAL 88 



85 




Gays &• 
Friends 



Gays and Friends a new or- 
ganization, established to 
provide social awareness and 
political involvement regard- 
ing issues. An information 
booth for AIDS Awareness 
Week, a minidocumentary, 
and an information Phone 
where all sponsored in the 
first year. Gays and Friends is 
open to all members of the 
college community. 



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1 988 members. 1 st row: Chris MacDonald, Jan Strother, John Kehoe. 2nd 
row: Tim Bratsos, Kelly Maddocks, Jo Spandry, Jennie Sommermann, Anne 
Becker, Wendy Noyes. 




Psychology 



1 388 members: 1 st now: Leonard 
Flynn, Janice Cednone, Karen Witt- 
brodt, Diane Wayland, Mary lannuzzo. 
2nd row: Kevin Witham, Dennis Foles, 
Hope Carajanes, Steve Sarnosky, Kelly 
Salmon, Fred Gracely. 



The Psychology Club is in- 
volved in both social and aca- 
demic programs that concern the 
science of psychology and its part 
in everyday society and its ex- 
planation of what goes on. This 
past year the Psychology club 
sponsored a bake sale at the fall 
sandbox to benefit their organiza- 
tion. 



86 



Clubs and Organizations 



FSCP1RG 



Existing on campus since 1980, 
FSCPIRG is one of the state wide 
chapters of MASSPIRG. The or- 
ganization is concerned with in- 
forming the college community 
about consumer, energy, and en- 
vironmental issues. Some of the 
issues FSCPIRG has been involved 
with have included concern of acid 
rain and chemical dumping in the 
waters of Massachusetts. PIRG 
allows students to learn about what 
effect people are having on their en- 
vironment. PIRG also teaches 
people who are interested about 
what they can do to help the abuse 
of the world around them. 




1 st row: Hilary Hodgkins and Peggy Frederickson. 2nd 
Maggie Oakes, Pattie Crisafulli, Dean Anes. 



7 



Hillel is the Jewish or- 
ganization on campus, 
which is open to all 
students. Holiday ac- 
tivities were planned 
which brought students 
together. They spon- 
sored speakers who dis- 
cussed topics relating 
from anti-Semitism to 
Jewish identity. They es- 
tablished an awareness 
of traditional and 
modern day Judaism. 



Hillel 




1 st row: Indira Moffett, Corny Spezeski, Lisa Rosen, Carie McGuire, Lynn Harlow. 
2nd now: Canton Schenn, Steve Wildfeuen, Stacy Toabe. 



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Dial 88 



87 




1st row: Many Murphy, Tom Dempsey, Kim Hewlight. 2dn row: Dave Kurt, 
Doreen Henzel, Mary Kerry O'Brien, Michelle Eplite, Chris Ferrari, Alan. 3rd 
^ow: John Ambacher, Doug Telling, George Jarnis, Joe Hodgkins. 



Politic 



cs 



The Politics Club is con- 
cerned with the future leaders 
of our country and the effect 
their politics will have on both 
domestic and worldwide con- 
cerns. This being an election 
year the change in leaders is 
offering the members of the 
Politics Club many new ques- 
tions about the leadership to 
follow. Their knowledge may 
provide some insight into the 
plans of leaders to come. They 
will understand the choices of a 
new government that will be 
coming at the end of the year. 



Students Against Driving Drunk 




1 st row: Mary Rapa, Treasurer; Cara Swan, Secretary. 
2nd now: Beth Wheeler, President; Jayne Costello, Vice 
President 



Students Against Driving Drunk or 
S.A.D.D., is a student run organization 
concerned with the alcohol situation 
concerning young adults. When con- 
sidering the prevalence of alcohol in col- 
leges, S.A.D.D. is determined to inform 
the public of its dangers. 



Clubs and Organizations 






• 




1 st row: Mike Rosetti, Dave Thomson, Carol Stucci, Tom Bates, Mike Merline, Heidi Scribner, Jason McElhiney. 
2nd row: Judy Kalloch, Virginia Petronio, Karen Havener, Cara Spiegal, Avisor Susan Walcovy, Bob Pembenton, 
Janet Sestokes, Rik Sansone, Carl MacNeal. 3rd Row: Nyal Fuentes, Phil Brangiforte, Rob Hendry, Paul Munafo, 
Christian Gilliat, Gary Robinson, Jen Diamond, Jim Shea 



WDJM 



WDJM, F.S.C.'s radio station, 
broadcasting at 91.3 FM offers a 
diverse and unusual place to turn 
when trying to avoid the repeti- 
tion of the Top 40 stations. DJM is 
known for being outspoken and 
up to date about what is going on 
in the world of music and the 
world outside. 

Students are invited to experi- 
ence a new way of looking at the 
world around them with the help 
of an interesting group of people. 




Mike Merline shows off his favorite radio 
stations t-shirt. 



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Cover of Spring Edition of Magnimarf. 




Lampoon 




1 9BB staff: Brian Delaney, Mike Malone, John Egan, 
John Hubbard. 



Magnimarf, F.S.C.'s satirical arts magazine offers 
the students a chance to poke fun at the college and 
aspects of student life. More memorable contri- 
butions included updated adventures of Curious 
George and letters against members of the FSC 
Administration. Magnimarf relies on the freedom of 
speech to allow FSC its satirical license. 



90 



Clubs and Organizations 



Gatepost 




Emily agrees that a messy desk is the 
key to success. 




The Gatepost, F.S.C.'s campus news- 
paper is the outlet to the college com- 
munity about what is going on and off 
campus. This past year the Gatepost had 
made sure that the student population 
knew about fee and tuition hikes, pos- 
sible faculty strikes. 

The Gatepost, recognized with the 
honor rating of first class winner from 
the Associated Collegiate Press, Editor 
Ron Maclnnis, Jr. , has been a publication 
determined to tell the students what is 
going on and to be a spokesman for the 
students. 



Expressing his frustration, John Egan, Graphics Editor, is ready to 
strangle the poor mac. 




Jeff enthusiastically reviews another interesting issue of the Gate- 
post. 






DIAL 88 



91 









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Asst. Editor Jen Roscoe checks and 
double checks hen notes. 



Photo chemicals must have done this, that's the only explana- 
tion to this face. 




Editor in Chief Ron Maclnnis works hard to stay with in the lines in order to put all the 
elements together for another issue. 







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Sports 




Mens and Women's Soccer 



The Men's soccer team led by 
tri-captains Peter Helliwell, 
Todd MacDonald, and Alan 
MacRae, was dealt a difficult 
season finishing with a 4-12 rec- 
ord. Individual high scorers in- 
clude Carlos Almeida and 



Joseph Dupuis; with a total of 7 
goals and 7 assists and a total of 
6 goals and 3 assists respec- 
tively. The team is looking for- 
ward to the challenge of a new 
season. 






Daniel Soopaya and Patrick 
Dailey go air bound after a free 
ball. 





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1st row: Peter Helliwell CCaptD, Paul Deshler, Dale Martin, Rob Nydam, Ryan 
Oullette, Philip Giordano. 2nd now: Jules Cesar CAsst. Coach], Andrew 
Morganti, Todd MacDonald CCaptD, Joseph Dupuis, Carlos Almeida, Alan 
MacRae CCapt], Patrick Dailey, Robert vanDenabeele, Daniel Soopaya, 
Matt Varrell, Les Seme [Head Coach]. 







DIAL 88 



101 





Lori Misulis and Cathy Stevenson 
team up to steal the ball from a 
North Adams player. 



1 st now: Julie Beckwand CCapt] and Chris Kranyak CCaptJ. Kneeling: Kellie 
Dewar, Emily Smith, Sharon Jacobson, Katie Binding, Lynne Elliot, Theresa 
Gaudreau, Patricia Mole, Beth Minnucci, Stephanie Moore. 2nd row: 
Lawrence Boyd [Head Coach], Larry Venis [Trainer], Kendra Daly, Michele De- 
simone, Susan Jerz, Jane O'Neill, Cathy Stevenson, Patty Daly, Karen Kane, 
Kelly Simmons, Lori Misulis, MaryEllen McGinn, Chris Grant (Asst Coach]. 








,*-*■*"*" 



Led by captains Julie Beckward 
and Chris Kranyak the women's 
soccer team had a successful sea- 
son finishing at a 10-6-1 record. 
There were many exciting wins 
with freshman Beth Minnucci 
leading the way with 14 goals and 



5 assists. F.S.C. recruited many 
talented women in the freshman 
class who have made the 
women's soccer team a force to be 
reckoned with in the seasons to 
follow. 




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Charging the ball, Arild Vaktskold scans the field in search 
of a team member to whom he can pass it. 





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Kellie Dewar battles to gain control of a loose ball. 



Elizabeth Minnucci makes a move to 
sweep the ball away from her op- 
ponenet. 














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Dial 88 



103 




Patricia Daly is blocked in by a challen- 
ger. 







Fullback Rob Nydam races after a loose ball. 





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Team member Carlos Almeida battles for possession 
of the ball. 



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104 



Sports 



Footbaii 




zi 




Preparing to receive the ball, John Blaine positions him- 
self to punt it down field in an attempt to gain yardage for 
the team. 











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DIAL 88 



105 









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1987 F.S.C. Football Team 





Kevin Gildea crunches another play. 



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The Rams ended the 1987 Football season with a 
2-6 record. The team showed a never quit attitude 
thanks to the leadership of senior captains, George 
Clafin, Paul Canney, Jim Jeahing and Mike Hock- 
ing. Leading scorers for this year included Senior 
John Blaine and Freshman Dennis Tarr, each with 5 
touchdowns. Other season leaders included Chris 
McDermot (interceptions), Frank Perfuto (Rush- 
ing), and Mike Hocking (Passing). Best of luck to 
next year's team! 



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Sports 










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Sports 



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1 st row: Liz Covalli, Cindy Walton, Katie Donnelly CCapt), Mary Barrow (Capt), Jodi 
McKeon, Debbie McArdle. 2nd row: Asst. Coach Robert Merryman, Laurie 
Comers, Stephanie Johnson, Kelly Morley, Una O'Brien, Susan Dieterle, Katie 
Sweeney, Head Coach Cynthia Souza. 




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109 




This year's women's volleyball 
team played well throughout the 
fall. Hours of diligent practice were 
involved, where skills were honed 
and techniques polished in order to 
stifle the competition. When game- 
time appeared, the team played as a 
well-synchronized unit both defen- 
sively and offensively. For all the 
hard work put forth, the team com- 
pleted the season with an MASCAC 
conference record of 3-3 and an 
overall NCAA division record of 10- 
22. 









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110 



Sports 



Cross Country 



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Maura Kennedy keeps pace. 



Senior Dan Harkins leads the pack. 




Keith Linquata, Paul McDonald, Steve Sanderson, Jen Sommermann, 
Hoar, Maura Kennedy, Tom Bates, Tabitha Brown, Scott Sambuchi. 



Dan 



The 1987-88 Framingham State Cross Country team under head coach 
Ned Price compiled a 3-6 record this past season. The team's MVP was 
sophomore Steve Sanderson. Senior Paul McDonald was voted the 
team's Unsung Hero. Some of the teams FSC competed against included 
MIT and Eastern Connecticut. The team's performance showed a 
strength that will be harnessed next year with the beginning of a new 
athletic season. 




DIAL 88 



111 



Field Hockey 




Brenda Brackett, Pam Marzeotti, Goalie Josee Fridmann, and Gillian Bethel await a free hit. 




1st row: Julianne Sampson, Tracey McHugh CCapt. ), Pam Marzeotti CCapt. .], Robin Pare CCapt.), 
Diane Howlett, Michelle Gadbois. 2nd now: Shelly Cummings CAsst. Coach), Josee Fridmann, 
Heather Anderson, Gillian Bethel, Jeanine Kowalski, Hillary Allen, Lauren Morelli, Brenda 
Brackett, Missy Romanelli [Manager), Torri Richards CHead Coach). 



112 






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114 



Sports 



Men's basketball 




1 st row: Captains: Mark Baer, Dwayne Sparks, Jim Hunt. 2nd now: Asst. Coach Harold McShane, Set 
Shuemate, Ray Morgan, John Blaine, Steve Marques, Jomo King, Tom O'Connell, Sean Jackman, Ste 
Pleasant, Rob Halvorsen, David Ware, Chris Broughton, Jim Berngan, Head Coach Kevin VanCisin. 




DIAL 88 



115 



Women's Basketball 




1st raw: Asst Coach Catherine Bowman, Loni Winters, Lisa Halloran, Melissa Statler, Kelly Simmons, Head 
Coach Michele Boisvert. 2nd row: Patty Green, Julie O'toole, Kristen Zapustas, Cindy Cieslak. 




Senior point guard Lori Winters dishes the ball off for another 
assist. 



The Men's Basketball team, de- 
spite a losing record of 7-15, had a 
number of good games with 
members of the team having ex- 
cellent personal games. Statisti- 
cally, freshman Sean Silverman 
topped the lists, averaging 15.7 
points per game. Lead by tri- 
captains Jim Hunt, Mark Baer and 
Dwayne Sparks, the team show- 
cased the season with an exciting 
end of the season win. 

Women's Basketball had a 
winning season going to the 
MAIAW finals at the end of the 
year. Point guard Lisa Halloran 
lead regular season play, averag- 
ing 22.4 points per game. Hope- 
fully next year's team will be' as 
successful. 



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DIAL 88 



117 



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Sports 



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1 st row: Matt DiDonna, Brian Guillemette, Mike Meehan, Eric Hagan, Steve Anderson, Rob Vose, Mike McCarthy. 
2nd row: Pam Hawkins [Trainer], John Binkoski CHead Coach], Kirsten Larsen [Statistician], Charlie Urato, Rob 
Matthews, Terry Hatch, Glen Chapman, Chris Maninno, Carl Buck, John Greaney, Bill Collins, Dave Mullahy, Tom 
White, Steve Mandozzi, Alan Hutchinson CAsst. Coach, Hilary Allen (MgrJ. 






DIAL 88 



119 





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Charlie Urato checks an opposing forward. 



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Chris Meninno C1 5] and Brian Guillemette C26D double team a Tufts 
player with the puck. 



The FSC Hockey Team unfortunately 
had a disappointing season ending with 
an overall record of 5-19-1. Despite the 
losing season, the team did finish the 
season with an impressive 5-2 win over 
Fairfield University. Junior Chris Men- 
inno led the way with an overall 29 
points for the season (16 goals, 13 
assists.) 




Indira Moffet — 7th place in Regionals at Colby- 
Sawyer College. 



The Equestrian team is an inter- 
collegiate sport competing with col- 
leges such as Tufts, Dartmouth and 
UNH. The Team competed this year 
and had a respectable season plac- 
ing reasonably well at regional com- 
petitions. 




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DIAL 88 



121 




■ 



1 st row: Many McLaughlin, Brenda Lynn, Trish McLure, Laura Rad- 
ford CCo-Captain), Heidi Webber CCaptainJ, Pat Sexauer. 2nd row: 
Karen Smith, Aimee Marchand, Indira Moffet, Carol Murphy, Wal- 
ter Oavis, Ann O'Neil. 



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Captain Heidi Webber placed 
fifth in this year's regionals. 



Co-Captain Laura Radford at Regional com- 
petition. 



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122 



Sports 



Baseball &• 
Softball 




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123 




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124 



Sports 




Kelly Morley makes the pitch. 



Kelly Simmons makes the hit. 



Mary Barros makes the catch. 




1 st row: Mary Barros, Colleen Clinkscale, Judy Carlton, bat boy Blake Mosher, Denise Ouimette, Pam Marzeotti, 
Julianne Sampson, Josee Fridmann. 2nd row: Trainer Cheryl Price, Head Coach Tom Kelley, Michele Melia, Lisa 
Halloran, Kelly Morley, Co-capt Julie OToole, Co-capt Lori Winters, Kelly Simmons, Patty Green, Deb Bochynski, 
Sue Jerz, Jill Adams, Asst. Coach Larry Mosher, Asst. Coach Shelly Cummings. 



■ 









DIAL 88 



125 



MAJHA* 




1 st row: Keith McMahon, Dan Tetrault, Vinny Monahan, Jeff Harris, James Whitfield, James Bartell, Dave Rubin, 
Dave Lorenzen. 2nd row: Asst. Coach Tim Friday, John O'Brien, Marc White, Steve Major, Kevin Hunt, Co-capt 
John Blaine, Co-Capt Jim Hunt, Keith Simonds, Mike Szczawinski, Mike Doody, Head Coach Sean O'Connor. 



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Senior Jim Hunt makes contact with a pitch. 



Freshman James Whitfield awaits ondeck. 



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134 



Faculty and Administration 



Ad 




Biology 



■■■ 





1st row: John Anderson, Susan Wahlrab, Betsy Burn. 2nd now: Jim Eng, Brucia 
Whitthoft, Leah Lipton, Janet Olson, Gene Sullivan [Chairperson}, Sachiko Beck. 




1 st row: Dr. William Spence, Dr. Judy Klaas [Chairperson], Dr. Dana Jost, Dr. 
William Barklow, Dr. Chester Roskey, Dr. Richard Beckwitt. 2nd now: Dr. Paul 
Cotter, Dr. Thomas Haight. 



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Faculty and Administration 




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138 



Faculty and Administration 




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English 



History 



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1 st row: Dr. Thomas Grove, Nancy Nyhan, Dr. Catherine McEue, Maxi Keats, Julia 
Scandrett, Mirium Levine, Dr. Helen Heineman [Chairperson]. 2nd row: David Reich, 
Dr. George Green, Dr. Jerry Natterstad, Catherine McLaughlin, Dr. Lois Ziegelman, 
Dr. Arthur Nolletti, Dr. Mary Murphy, Dr. Mark Seiden. 




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DIAL 88 



139 




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Faculty and Administration 




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142 



Faculty and Administration 



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Music 




( 



James Savas [Chairperson], Edward Melegian, Stephen Fiore, Jos- 
ephine Reiter. 




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145 



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147 



Counseling Center 



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1 st row: Alice Kociemba, Nancy Cherico Ph. D. [Director]. 
2nd row: Lynne Bennett, Alan Lazerson Md. , Cindy Benson 



Financial Aid 






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1 st row: L. Merriam, A. Salvi, M. Oakes, L. Anderson [Director]. 2nd row: K. Threadgold, D. Boyle 



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148 




Faculty and Administration 



Health 
Services 



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8SSSSSSSSSSBSSSSSBSSSSS 



Ginger Rierdan, Cheni Kavanagh, Soyna Sears, Carol Wilson, 
Betty Dion. 



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CI to r): Bruce Buckley, Waleed Kawalas, Kim Knox, Stu Gephart. 




Eddie Fox, Connie Afthim Reedy. 
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Service 



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Public 

Relations 




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150 



Faculty and Administration 



f'ssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssf 8 



Student Services 




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152 



Faculty and Administration 




Officer Rick Clank 



Officer Peter Bonitatibus 




SS 



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153 




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154 



Faculty and Administration 




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156 



Faculty and Administration 




Executive 
Officers 



Any institution must have 
people who help keep all aspects 
in proper balance. Those respon- 
sible for keeping F.S.C. on an 
even keel are represented on 
these pages. They look to pro- 
mote the general well-being of the 
college and keep it running 
throughout the year. 



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Kelly Aguiar 
Clothing and Textiles 



Karen Albinson 
Early Childhood Education 



Celdra Allen 
Clothing and Textiles 



Nura Ahmed 
Food and Nutrition 




Hemalatha Alexander 
Business Administration 





Diane Amaral 
Sociology 



Susan Anastas 
Art 



Linda Andreola 
Clothing and Textiles 




Eva Apostolopoulos 
Economics 



Roland 0. Arcand, Jr. 
Geography 



Linda Arrhambault 
Chemistry 



160 






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DIAL 88 



33 



Arts 6^ Humanities Programs 




Tom Cottle lectures on "Tomorrow's Family. 




Author David McCord signs his book "One Day at A 
Time. " 




Ralph Nadar lectures on "The Mence of 
Atomic Energy. " 



The Arts and Humanities Programs of 
this year have resulted in inviting many 
distinguished people to address the college 
community. Some of this semesters guests 
included Ralph Nadar, Dr. Tom Cottle, 
Jane Brody, Authors Toni Morrisson, 
David McCord and RoseEllen Brown. 
Future Arts and Humanities Programs will 
provide campus with many other intelli- 
gent and interesting points of view. 



34 



Student Life 




Author Stephen Kellogg. 




Lieutenant Governor Evelyn Murphy speaks on "Women in 
Politics. " 






Jack Fultz discussing sports. 



DIAL 88 



35 




Cambodian journalist Dith Pran recounts his ex 
periences with the fall to the Khmer Rouge. 



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36 



Student Life 



Ram Aid 111 



Ram Aid III, sponsored by the Class of 88, is one of the 
college's more popular events. It gives the students a 
chance to act as their favorite performers. A chance to let 
loose, have a lot of fun, and maybe even get prize money 
for it. This year's winner gave us his impression of 
Whitney Houston. Ram Aid lets us take a tongue-in- 
cheek look at pop culture. It always provides for a lot of 
laughs. You never know what you are going to see. It is 
certainly one of the more interesting outlets for creative 
expression at F.S.C. 




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Student Life 




SandboxXXV 




Fun was had by all at the silver an- 
niversary spring Sandbox XXV 
which featured many new attrac- 
tions. Among the more popular 
were the "Create your own News- 
paper Headlines" and a special re- 
cording booth where students could 
make a tape of themselves singing 
their favorite song. 

Other booths included balloon 
animals, photo-buttons and a cari- 
caturist. There were plenty of co- 
medians amusing the crowd while 
executing sleight of hand. 

The crowd braved a chilly wind 
outside while enjoying the talent of 
Kevin Spencer magician, campus 
bands and free Smartfood popcorn. 



DIAL 88 



39 






Beth waits patiently to see how her picture came out. 




Students wait to get into the popular recording booth. 





40 



Student Life 








The bands at Sandbox XXV offered a sampling of the 
musical talent on campus. Many styles of music were 
showcased from rock and roll to rap. Also included was the 
final Sandbox performance of local band, Nitrous, led by 
Jeff Chaulk. Nitrous has provided the closing band per- 
formance for several past Sandbox weekends. Once again 
the Sandbox celebration gave the students plenty to party 
with until it came time to be students once again. 



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DIAL 88 



41 




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42 



Student Life 




Heard it through the — says Karen as she picks up the back of the 
line. 




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The men enjoy a cold been while listening to the concert from the pub. 



The Boyz performed at the Sandbox XXV 
concert/dance. The dance brought 
Sandbox XXV to a good close. The crowd 
had a chance to dance the night away 
thanks to the great music. 





DIAL 88 



43 







The Boyz 







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The ladies enjoy a pitcher of been too. 





A birds-eye view of the fun the crowd is ex- 
periencing at the dance. 







44 



Student Life 




Larned Hall 




Behold, our fearless leaden, Elis- 
abeth Hogan. 



Larned Hall houses ap- 
proximately 400 co-ed stu- 
dents. These students are in top 
physical condition from brav- 
ing that never ending hill that 
they live upon. Also, being the 
dorm closest to the library, 
Larned's students are an ex- 
ample of upmost intelligence. 
Hall Government provided 
students with monthly news- 
letters and other activities to en- 
tertain themselves. 




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DIAL 88 




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Towers Hall, the largest co-ed resi- 
dence hall on campus houses between 
450 and 500 students. Being one of the 
more popular dorms on campus, Towers 
has a reputation of being one of the 
better dorms to live in. Due to the size, it 
allows for many different types of people 
to be put together. This, of course, pro- 
vides large groups a chance to get 
together and study. When all the work is 
done they can have fun too. It is. always 
important to have correct priorities. 



Student Life 



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Please deposit 1 Oi£ for an additional three minutes. 



Linsley Hall is the third co-ed 
dorm at F.S.C. The three floor 
building houses approximately 
thirty five males and (lucky for 
them) two hundred and sev- 
enty females. Linsley, not 
being located in the center of 
campus is not often a first 
choice for incoming students. 
The students residing there, 
however have had pleasant ex- 
periences. Linsley has been de- 
scribed by its students as a 
"close-knit" residential com- 
munity. 





1*5 RM& 



H! 




Jill Mucciarone 
Biology 




Ann Murphy 
Economics 



Kelly Nicholson 
Clothing and Textiles 



Steven O'Brien 
Media Communications 




tiJ 






Mary C. Murphy 
Politics 



M. Merrie Najimy 
Early Childhood Education 



Robert Nelson 
Economics 




Jill Niemczyk 
Consumer and Family Studies 



Jessica Niro 
History 



Lisa Norander 
Early Childhood Education 



Timothy CLoughlin 
Mathematics 




Kathleen ONei 
Clothing and Textiles 



Bruce Owens 
Mathematics 



Kristen Pankowski 
Media Communications 



178 




Kathleen Powers 
Psychology 



Maureen Powers 
Consumer and Family Studies 



James Prendergast 
Economics 




Christopher Provines 
Economics 

179 






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Karen Pryor 
Consumer and Family Studies 











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Susan Pulhorn 
Economies 




Karen Purdy 
Food and Nutrition 




James Quinn 
Socioloev 



Theresa Quinn 
Psychology 



Michelle Radie 
Politics 




Karen J. Rafferty 
English 



Jeffrey Randall 
History 



Christina Rapp 
Early Childhood Education 



Thomas Reusch 
Media Communications 



180 



I 





Christine Ronayne 
Clothing and Textiles 



Christine Rigopoulos 
Psychology 



Aimee Lynn Roberts 
Psychology 



Pamela Rodrigues 
Media Communications 



Cynthia Roger 
Riology 



Celine Roberts 
Art 




Norma Rokes 
Food and Nutrition 




Michael Peter Roppolc 
Mathematics 



Carola Jane Ross 
Food and Nutrition 



Stephen J. Ross 




Gail Salvucci 
English 



Mary Sanborn 
Riology 



Mark Santamaria 
Riology 



Stephen Sarnosky 
Psychology 



181 



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Mark Seaman 
Economics 



RoseMary Sharry 
English 



Lydia Marie Serrano 
Early Childhood Education 



Christopher Shanahan 
Economics 



Mathioli Shanmugasundaram 
Computer Science 




Mary Shaughnessy 
Sociology 



Bernadette C. Shaw 
Psychology 



Paul J. Shaw 
Business Administration 




Kathleen Sheehan 
Economics 



Tamera Sheehan 
Psychology 



Melanie Short 
Psychology 



182 







Snadra Sooley 
Art 



Sandra Soroka 
Clothing and Textiles 



Jeffrey Spence 
Media Communications 



Cynthia St. Cyr 
Media Communications 



Brendan J. St. George 
English 



Lisa St. Germain 
Psychology 



Holly Catherine Spun 
Medical Technology 




Linda Stobbart 
Politics 



183 






■ 







Tracy Stowers 
English 



Lisa Sullivan 
Psychology 



Matthew Sullivan 
Sociology 



Maureen Sugrue 
Early Childhood Education 




Mark Sullivan 
Economics 





Terence Sullivan 
Sociology 



Cara A. Swan 
Consumer and Family Studies 



Kathleen Swift 
Clothing and Textiles 




Richard Talbot, Jr. 
History 



Julie Tambascio 
Media Communications 



Anita Terzi 
English 



Kelli Tessicini 
Mathematics 



184 




Daniel Tetrault 
History 



Karen Thurson 
Food and Nutrition 





Belinda 


Valente 




Economics 




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Shiela Venkataswamy 
Sociology 



Hei<li Thalei 
Spanish 



Carolyn Todd 
Computer Science 



David E. Valinote 

Sociology 



Kelley Vroom 
Psychology 



Karen L. Thayer 
Consumer and Family Studies 

■hhhhhhh 



John Tosney 
History 



Richard J. Vanaria 
Economics 



Maureen Wade 
Consumer and Family Studies 



Deborah Thornton 
Clothing and Textiles 




Dana K. Turchi 
Geography 




Michael Vasel 
Economics 




Karen P. Walsh 
Food and Nutrition 



185 



■ 

E4M *KtMQ 




Lesley Ware 
Media Communications 



Heidi Webber 
Elementary Education 



Linda Weidner 
Economics 



Ann Welch 
Psychology 



Jonathan Welsh 
Geography 



Susan Wennerberg 
Media Communications 



Elizabeth A. Wheeler 
Consumer and Family Studies 



Diane Whelan 
Psychology 



Gregory White 
History 



Maxine Whitney 
Food and Nutrition 



Arlene Welby 
Economics 




Karen Wesley 
Psychology 




Anne Whitlock 
Early Childhood Education 








Jane \ oung 
Psychology 



Judy Yung 
English 



Gina Zaccaria 
Economics 



Mark Zibel 

Sociology 




■ 






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CAMERA SHY GRADUATES 

BACHELOR OF ARTJ 
ART 

Sandra Fkzsimmons 
Judith Lynne Flesche 
Marilyn Sue Freema 
Paula Marie Gagliani 
Christine Anne McCarthy 
Kathleen Flizabeth McCluskey 
Veronica C. McMahon 
Elizabeth Doone Quill 
Thomas Frank Quinn 
Gregory Joseph Robinson 

ichelle King Teal 

ark Anthony Traietti 
a Jean Weitz-Miller 
een Jane Wilson 
.line I/. Wilson 

ECONOMICS 

Laeey Odis Patrick Corbett, 
James Michael Curran 
Audrey B. Davidson 
Richard William Delaporta 
Maureen DiGravio 
Joseph Patrick Hayes 
Joseph Peter Hodgkins 
Philip McGowan Jones 
Elaine M. Keaney 
Patrick Joseph Kearney 
Stephen James Kergo 
James Michael Kilgallon 
James William Kostka 
Allen Timothy Larkin 
Rita Antoinette Leazott 
P, Glenn MaeDonnell 
Frank Michael Malzone 
Suzanne Marie Moore 
Mark Richard Murjdiy 
Allan Charles Musche 
Lisa J. Mussoiii 
Kathleen A, (VKane 
Agnes Li Pallozzi 
Maureen A. Peterson 
David John Piantedosi 
Thomas Edward Piemontese 
Andrew Luke Pongratz 
Stephen Scalley 
Paul Sekula 
Alan Walton Sharpe 
Rosomarie Theresa Sollhna 
Deborah Lynne Triiier 
Michelle Hence Von Hendv 
David S. Walsh 



ENGLISH 

Peter George Riueniinel 
Jeannine Ghartier 
Brenda M. Crowley 
Laura Jean Draper 
Jeanne Edwards 
Daniel Francis Lynch 
Carolyn Mary O'Reilly 
Jean Panke 
Norma Srhoificld Park 
Sylvia Volanda Ouiroga 
Donna Najariau Shea 
Kathleen Sullivan 
Christine Marie Tejciro 

FRENCH 

Lea Beausoleil Huxley 

GEOGRAPHY 

hv le Patrick I, arson 







HISTORY 

Steven Francis Adams 
David W. Dobson 
Richard Gary Gabrielson 
Mary Theresa MaeDougall 
Susan Mary Price 
Beth Anne Savage 

PHILOSOPHY 

Richard Patrick Creedon 
Joseph Paul VanBuskirk 



POLITICS 

Kimberly A. Englert 

Mart a Irene Escotet 

Meghan Anne Victoria Gannon 

Michael P. Gerace 

Alan George Lappas 

Karen Edith Vlass 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Deborah S. Brand 
Robert David Bretman 
Eileen Ann Britt 
Catherine Victoria Burgess 
June Sivell Coldreck 
Sandra C. Comastra 
Lisette Cunningham 
Susan Theresa Daley 
Teresa Ann Davenport 
Sarah Nowlin Douthit 
Demetra Mary Elis 
June Marie Hinds 
Katharina Jarmas 
Rohland Harold Kerkhoff 
Barbara Ann Luetters 
Lauren Jean MaeArthu 
Julia Virginia Mansur 
Aleua Mullen 
Dona-Jeanne Mimmo 
Lauren M. O'Sullivan 
Judith L. Pierce 
Arlene Scbo 
Kathy Lauren Simon 
Sheilas; Smith 
Felice John Vergoria 
Kathleen M. Verm 
Christine Dale Walker 
Karen Marie Wittbrodt 

SOCIOLOGY' 

Philip Edward Arsenault 
Jill Marie Collins 
Michael Edward H 
Patricia Anne Kno 
D. Reid Lowell 
Marie M. Mullaney 
Kathleen Ann Samp 
("beryl Haley Sautenas 

SPANISH 

Andrea Beraadette Castell 
Paida Diane Charron 
Deborah Susan Suarez 



1L0R OF SCIE 
BIOLOGY 

Elsie M. DcLeo 
Julie Susanne Denman 
Stephen Arthur Diamond 
Albeit John Girard, II 




Diane Lynne Haagensen 
Deborah Anne Hyland 
Slaci K. Kerrigan 
Mildred Callahan Kihn 
Lori Jeanne Koroski 
Diane Kiaine Pay tun, 
Marie Sarris Phinkett 
Diana Lee Sardonini 



HI SIN CSS ADMINISTRATION 

Romona Marie Crescitelli 

Daniel Patrick Murphy ml. . < 

Judith liee Pesaturo 

Cynthia Ann Sclent 

Peter Christoph« i \ mBuskirk 

CHEMISTRY 

Sally Kent 

CLOTHING AND TEXTILES 

Susan Marie Fahy 
Lisa Ann Cagne 
Kim Michelle Cerbick 
Margaret DaiJey Gray 
Mary Jane Healey 
Susan Hilhnann 
Lisa Ann Howard 
Rose Kallai Jones 
Maureen Ann Leary-J 
Patricia Lynn Lively 
Natalie Marie Morris 
Diana Marie Papagni 
Carol Ann Porter 
Amy Marie Put 
Taniara Marie Scali 
Maria ( '.a i mi la Sceppa 
Jacqueline Lee Sew a 
Rohyu MaryeUen St. 
Donna Lynn Wilfert 
Sophia Zigotegos 

COMPUTER SC 

Richard II. Breen 
Leonard Cardos 
W. James Cillis 
Sheldon P. Gring( 
Kathleen Ann Ke 
John Olgierd Mite 
Wendy J. Roescin 
Ofer I). Sehneii 
Jan L. Strolher P» 

Lihui C. Tung ^—f 

CONSUMER AND EAMI 

Marsha Hope Greenstein 
Jill Christine Hahn 
Pracey Arm Lincoln 
Sheila Mary McDonough 
( Ineri Jean Moran 
Susanne Marie Murphy 

EARTH SCIENCE 

Elizabeth A. Brousscau 

FOOD AND NUTRITION 

Dianne Marie Butera 

Lain a Fell 

Sheila Marie Hannen 

Patricia Hayes 

Kindierly Alice Hoard 

Dehra Ann Jones 

Dawn Alexandria Macleod 

Margaret S. Masood/.adehgan 

Patricia Anne O'Connor 

Margaret Louise Oliva 

Denise Rae Richardson 

Mareia Victoria Taylor 

Colleen Whalen 




k 






00D SCIENCE 

Marian Chrvsostom Gabriel S|w. 
Robert Blanchard Price 

MEDIA C0MMUN1 C ATI ( ) N S 

Jeffrey Patrick Cintolo 

David Michael Fontaine 

Jennifer Aline Leverone 

William Martinis H 

Sheri Joyce Pokat 

Peter Sehipelliti 

M E I) I C AL TECHN LOGY 

Carolvn A. Cyr 

Martha Ann Manila 

Diana Lynn Miller 

Tara Murphy 

Tracy Lyn Bobbins 

Betsy Ann Shapiro 

Jennifer Lynn Vkardrop j~jti_ 

NURSING 

Karen Joan Anderson 
Heather Lynn Bobeek 
Amy Sue Borden 
Theresa R. Cuinmings 
Mary Theresa Dalpe 
Grenda Laura Dlott 
Cynthia Ann Gambon 
Lynn Marie Garry 
Sara Madeline Gillis 
Lori Jeahbne Hines 
Michelle Kirley 
Anne Marie Lydon 
Carol Ann Me.Davitt 
Lorae Pbclan 
Deborah Lvnn Stone 



CHELOR OF 



EARLY CHILDHO* 2ATI0 

Gail Elaine Abelow 
Susan Casey Barber 
Karen Mary Baronc«j 
Donna Marie Dimat 
Michelle Ann Giran 
Robert J. Lamothe, Jr. 
Jacqueline Marie Matthews 
lizabeth McFarland 
aureen Ellen Ryan 
Mary L. Sage 
Kathleen Dee Sherman 
Sandra Beth Siegal 









■ 




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Senior Events 







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Seniors 



Senior Investiture 



The first Senior event of the year 
was Senior Investiture which was 
part of Homecoming Weekend. 
This was the first time the Class of 
1988 gathered as the Senior Class. 
Seniors, their families and faculty 
members listened to words of 
advice from President Weller, Vice 
Presidents Adler and Chaves, Jos- 
ephine Reiter, Class President 
Michelle Radie and keynote 
speaker Mike Barnicle. 




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DIAL 88 



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Seniors 



Senior Countdown 




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198 



Seniors 



Senior Week 



Senior Week began on Sunday May 15th with a trip to 
Boston to watch the Red Sox play the Seattle Mariners. Later 
that day there was a cookout on Dwight Field which was fol- 
lowed by an outdoor showing of St. Elmo's Fire. 



Red Sox Game 




DIAL 88 



■VHh 










199 





Who's On Fir si 



On Monday FSC Seniors returned to Boston 
to party at the ever popular Who's On First 
sports bar. Over 300 Seniors and their friends 
packed the place, which had been reserved 
solely for FSC for the night. 




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200 



Seniors 



Newport 






The Class of 88 bussed it to Newport, 
Rhode Island on Tuesday to continue the 
Senior Week festivities. Despite the bad 
weather those who went had fun visiting 
the shops and mansions that Newport is 
famous for. 







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DIAL 88 



201 



Commencement 
Rehearsal . . . 




xV 



Seniors had to report to Dwight Hall Auditorium early Wednes- 
day morning to practice the commencement ceremonies. By arrang- 
ing themselves alphabetically by major the Class of 88 proved that 
they were in fact ready to be called "College Graduates." 



Educatfonl 



And Harbor Cruise 




Boston was once again the destination Wednes- 
day night. This time for a cruise around beautiful 
Boston Harbor. 



202 



Seniors 



Commencement Bait 

The Crowne Plaza Hotel in Natick was the site for 
this year's Commencement Ball, Thursday May 19th. 
After an elegant dinner couples, danced the night 
away to the music of Magazine. 



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203 



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204 



Seniors 



Baccalaureate . . . 



( 



Seniors gathered Saturday afternoon for a 
Baccalaureate ceremony which was a time to 
reflect back over their years at FSC. Readings 
were presented by Paul McDonald, Dr. 
Arthur Chaves, Chief David Cella, Father 
John Culloty, and Ellen Servetnick. 






And Senior- Family Dinner 





After the Baccalaureate many Se- 
niors and their families went to the 
College Center for Cocktail Hour and 
Dinner. 




DIAL 88 



205 



Commencement 



On Sunday May 22nd, 1988 the class of 1988 gathered on the 
Framingham Green to receive their degrees in front of family, 
friends and faculty. Honorary degrees were conferred upon 
John Edward Burke, Josephine Buckley Fair, Dorothy Larned, 
and Keynote Speaker Senator William M. Bulger. 




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219 



in> b b a s a fl-a o a 6 fl b a a a 6 fl a a » a awae a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a g v~mnnmrvrww 




CONGRATULATIONS 

and 

BEST WISHES TO THE 

CLASS OF 1988 




9 



■■ 



FTC 



220 



DIAL Staff 



D 
J 
A 

L 




1 st Row: Linda Andreola, Johanna Pescarino, Kristin Larkin, Christine Halpen. 2nd Row: 
Susan Dainis, Kim Rogers, Eric Araujo, Alenda Nizzari. 




The Great Norm Benrimo. 





Photographer George Leite 
switches from behind to in front 
of the camera. 



DIAL 88 



221 




Bonnie Glass, reinforces the 

theme! 






Kim Sonois, photographer. 



Linda works diligently on the 
cover design. 




E.I.C., smiles for the 

camera. 




Rick spends time working on 
his section. 



Theresa, Faculty and 
Administration Co-Editor 



222 



DIAL Staff/Patron Page 



Letter from ike Editor 



The time came to sit down and write this letter 1 had to ask myself why as 
the editor 1 had to write anything at all. M;y dedication and commitment to 
the book I think is shown in that I stuck it out for the completion and did not 
quit even when I really wanted to. Then 1 thought that I should briefly 
express my thoughts about this edition and the people who were an integral 
part of its completion. 

The theme was decided to be a play on words of the name of the yearbook: 
DIAL . . . In the 1 980' s the popularity of the telephone has grown tremen- 
dously. Personally and through business the telephone is used a great deal 
with the up rise of personalized telephone services; i.e. phone-a-friend, 
sports results, answering machines, and weather update services, we de- 
cided that this would be a good theme to follow. As you look through the 
book you will find a variety of people on the phones and pages that represent 
a phone book. 

The list of people to thank is enormous and there is not enough room in 
this 224 page book to express my gratitude to them. But, individual thanks 
must be given to a few who especially helped me through to the completion. 
Mike, thank-you because, although we didn't quite always meet on time 
and the interruptions sometimes seemed never ending, you were there when 
it counted. In my opinion, Linda deserves the biggest thanks of all, with out 
her I would of been sunk. Alenda rescued me second semester and took the 
never ending job of getting the photographs taken and filed. Mary; although 



we didn't quite meet the deadlines it is done anyway, thanks. Thanks to the 
puzzle wizard, your help was greatly appreciated. And not to forget Rick, 
Eric and Chris thanks for the hours you dedicated. Thanks also to the 
Athletic Office and Peter Schipelliti for all the sports pictures. Also, Larry 
and Ellen, thanks for all the advice you had time to give me. Barbara with 
out you I would not know where to turn for the answers. Deb and BigMac, 
what can 1 say but thanks for the suggestions and the keys. Thanks also goes 
out to the Great Norm Benrimo, your support was great, thanks; and also 
Dick, thanks for answering my never-ending questions. Last but not least to 
my family, thanks for understanding why I am going to do this again next 
year. Kristin, Linda and Alenda — The end is HERE! Finally to everyone 
else THANKS', without you it would not have been possible; however small 
your connection or involvement was. 

Looking back on this experience, I see how it has positively affected me. I 
learned about human nature, politics, and the business world. I honestly 
can say 1 did not regret one moment of this year. The long hours have finally 
paid off and 1 sincerely hope you have enjoyed looking through this edition, I 
enjoyed working on it and with the people involved. We worked hard all year 
to make sure as many aspects and events where pictorially represented. 
After the headaches, arguments, and long hours we tried our best to repre- 
sent as much we could. 



DIAL 1388 



Editor-in-Chief Beth A. Jacavanco 

Layout Editor Linda Andreola 

Photo Editor Alenda Nizzari 

Copy Editor Mary Mullen 

Clubs & Organizations Co-editors Eric Araujo & 

Theresa McConkey 
Faculty & Administration .. Christine Halpen & 

Bonnie Glass 

Senior Editor Rick Buckingham 

Business Co-editors Johanna Pescarino & 

Kim Rogers 

Advisor Michael Miller 

Cover & Division Page Designs Linda Andreola 



Staff: 



Melissa Aumais 
Susan Dainis 
Kris Larkin 
George Leite 
Melanie Murphy 
Rich Porcelli 
Kim Sirois 
Tricia Stone 
Chris Wood 



DIAL 88 



223 




Best Wishes from: 



A Friend 

Kelly Aguiar 

Mr. & Mrs. Zaven Akillian 

Mr. & Mrs. Roland O. Arcand 

John & Ellen Baker 

The Charles Barry Family 

Paul Michael Blanchard 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles L. Buckingham 

The Canneys 

Mr. & Mrs. John R. Casey 

Mr. & Mrs. Eugene Coakley 

Janice Cohen 

Howard & Phyllis Craven 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert G. Daly 

Mr. & Mrs. E.P. Demetri 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert E. Dempsey, Jr. 

Martha E. Dewar and family 

Congratulations Maria/ 

Mr. & Mrs. Philip Donato 
Antonio Fajio 
Carl J. Famiano 
Donald B. Foote 



Mr. & Mrs 
Mr. & Mrs 
Mr. & Mrs 
Sara Gillis 
Mr. & Mrs 
Mr. & Mrs 



Cliff Guyette and Family 
William Heemskerk 



Paul and Maria Hojlo 
Mr. & Mrs. Edward A. Holda 
The Jacavanco Family 
Kelleher Family 



Fred and Ann Kurt 

Robert & Carolyn Knight 

Mr. & Mrs. Andre Laliberte 

Bob and Pat Langley 

Mr. & Mrs. A.L. Lavery 

Ginny and Bob Marino 

Mr. & Mrs. James T. McLaughlin 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Merline 

In Memoriam of Linda Meserve 

Family of Kevin Milligan 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Norander 

Michael & Nancy O'Connor 

Ruth and Bob O'Loughlin 

Mr. & Mrs. Warren H. Pettingell 

Joseph & Kathleen Prendergast 

John & Nancy Rafferty 

Mr. & Mrs. Norman Robida 

Mitchell Rosenblatt 

Mr. & Mrs. Harry Sanborn 

Ann & Jim Schock 

Mr. & Mrs. Seraphin Silva & Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry J. St. Cyr 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald & Lucille Swan 

Mr. & Mrs. John F. Valinote 

Mary A. Weidner 

Mr. & Mrs. John White 

The Whitlock Family 

Kenneth and Carol Wilder 

Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Zibel 



224 




Coloph 



on 



The Framingham State College 1988 DIAL was 
printed by Hunter Publishing Company of 
Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Yearbook Associ- 
ates provided all film and did most of the develop- 
ing and printing of pictures as well as shooting the 
Senior Portraits. The book has an 8V2" x 11" format 
with 224 pages (200 black and white and 24 color). 
The paper used is gloss. The fonts used are Ven- 
ture Script 36 point: headlines; Palatino 12 pt: body 
copy; Eurostile 10 point: captions; and Avant Book 
10 point: kickers. All ink is Hunter Black. The cover 
was designed by Linda Andreola and is a two-color 
lithograph. The book was completed on June 20, 
1988. 



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